Tapestry Bird Complete

 Distelfink Woven Tapestry ~

Distelfink woven tapestry

Distelfink woven tapestry

The distelfink woven tapestry hex sign is finished.  I worked on this project to advance my tapestry weaving skills.  Now I have to figure out what to do with it.  I want to hang it on the wall of course.  There are a few things I have to consider.  Do I line the back, how do I hang it, what hardware to use and how do I make it stand out since it’s small?  So much to consider, and I tried a few things before I settled on anything.  A few trial and errors later and it’s nearly “wall ready”.

Tacking down selvage to make weaving even

Tacking down selvage to make weaving even

First things first, I can’t hang it while it’s still mounted on the loom (I could, but it’s not what I’m looking for).  I need to remove it from the loom, and take out the bottom hem.  First I removed the bottom hem, it was there to get me started.  Having a difficult time keeping the bottom even, I have a better idea why we start at the very bottom of the loom.  Since I’ve not settled on a finishing treatment, I cut it from the loom, leaving as much warp as possible.  I measured the sides to give me an idea how much my selvages were off from top to bottom.  Conventional tapestry weaving has given me a challenge keeping my sides straight (I seem to have this challenge with every type of weaving).  Using a measure guide, pins and an iron, I get my tapestry squared up as much as possible. I folded some of the sides to the back to make it more even.  I pinned and pressed it to hold; I tacked down the extra with a needle and sewing thread.  It’s not perfect, but it looks better.

Adding beads to bottom warp

Adding beads to bottom warp

I tried several treatments with the warp threads before I settled on using beads.  Having more experience with Navajo weaving, I don’t usually have these warp threads to contend with.  I tried knots, then a hem, then I found some wood beads that I thought would go well with the image, and would add some weight.  I began by placing two threads through a bead along the bottom, and it didn’t take long to realize the beads were too crowded.  I played around with it until I got it.  Using three strands per bead, and adding another row that was staggered, gave me the look I wanted.  I tied these off using an over hand knot and knotting tweezers to place my knot where I wanted. I used a similar treatment to the top.  

Placing knot to connect bamboo

Placing knot to connect bamboo

I bought a canvas to paint an abstract background on, and mount the weaving.  I was perplexed as to how I was going to mount it to the canvas.  I thought about using a stick to tie the top warps to and hang from.  I have some bamboo, so I measured the length I wanted, and cut the piece with a razor knife.  I tried a variety of ways to connect the weaving to the bamboo.  I used T-pins to hold the bamboo and weaving in place.  I settled on pulling one warp behind the bamboo and two over, then tying an overhand knot and placing it well behind the bamboo, hiding it from the front.  I like the look of it.  I may still mount it to a canvas.  I’ll need a larger canvas than the one I bought.  If I use one, then I’ll paint the canvas, perhaps with a combination of blues and white, and mount the weaving to it.  Then I can find an empty wall, preferably near a door.  The distelfink is a stylized European Goldfinch, and it’s used in Fraktar (Pennsylvania Dutch folk art) to symbolize Happiness and Good Fortune.   

A website devoted to learning, sharing and teaching a wide range of fiber arts. Inkle, Tablet and Navajo style weaving, Spinning, Knitting, Crochet, Sewing and Lace Making. Silver Work, Beading and Tool Making grace my bench as well.

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