Scissor Pouch

Finished and stuffed

Finished and stuffed

After working with scissors as my main tool for 30 years, I’ve developed quite a selection.  There are scissors everywhere, in the kitchen, living room, and especially the craft room.  They’re almost always laying around, stuck in a tool organizer, or a drawer.  However, I always have a pair near me when I work.  Most often, I have an ornate pair of 1928 scissors in a beautifully enameled holder.  They always wind up on the bottom, underneath everything – hiding.  I love to look at them and use them.  They’re beautiful and hold significant positive memories from when my mother gave them to me.  We found them in Savanna Georgia, in a little shop on the river-front.  I decided it was time to make a little organizer pouch, where they can be kept safe, handy, and visible.  I found several cute pouch patterns (online, of course); some require seamstress skills, and one was almost too simple.  I made the super-simple one first.  I really like it.  And it makes great use of fat-quarters 🙂  Finally, I have a project in mind the next time I drool over the display of fat-quarters.

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You can make a pattern real easy; just take a piece of regular typing paper and fold.  Lay the paper so it’s oriented the way it would be to read from it.  Fold the lower edge to the left edge and crease.  Open the paper back up, then lower the left edge to the crease, and make a new crease.  Leave the left side folded and creased, now lift the lower edge back along its crease.  Take the part of that lower edge and fold it back to meet the first crease.  You can make your scissor pouch just like this, but I find the long point useless and unattractive.  I fold the bottom tip to about 1/2 to 3/4 inch from the edge of the shortest “pocket”, make a crease, then cut at that crease.  I didn’t actually use a pattern, but it was good practice and you will have a cut out piece for a pattern if you chose this option.

Pin well, leave an opening

Pin well, leave an opening

I found some fat-quarters that I liked, they go together but are still different.  First, I ironed both of my fabrics flat, then applied a fusible interfacing/stabilizer to my printed fabric.  Rather than use a pattern, I measured and cut with my rotary blade and mat to 8.5″ X 11″.  I cut both fabrics (fashion and background) at the same time.  The fat-quarters (18″ x 22″ normally) are big enough for four pouches 😉 Who doesn’t have three friends in need?  I laid one piece of printed and stabilized fabric with one piece of background fabric, wrong sides together.  I pinned them together all the way around and planned for a 2″ to 3″ section to leave open to turn them right sides out.  The best placement for your opening is on the side that will be turned to the inside.  I used the template/pattern from the paper to cut a corner away for a square bottom.  I like to turn the pin sideways in the spot I plan to leave open.  This is a reminder, not to sew this section.  I’ve been known to sew my opening closed, or forget to open a zipper on a pouch, or…  Insert list of mishaps.

1/2" seam allowance, sew wrong sides together

1/2″ seam allowance, sew wrong sides together

At my sewing machine, I threaded my machine matching the background cloth, it blended well with the printed fabric as well (consider this when choosing materials.)  I chose a tighter straight stitch (2) for my seams and used a 1/2″ seam allowance – backing over my stitches at the beginning and end of the seam.  Of course, when I reach my perpendicular pin, I stop sewing for the opening.  I pressed my piece flat, setting the stitches into the fabric.  I then clipped the corners 1/8″ from the stitches and clipped notches out of the cut out area.  I pressed the seams open, and paid extra attention to the opening so it would lay right when it is all turned out.  Next is the “magic hat trick”, or at least that’s what it reminds me of, when you turn your project right side out.  I used the point of a pair of scissors to shape the points in the seam.  I gave it a good press to flatten it.  The next part of the project is to make the same folds as noted with the paper, creasing with your iron, of course.  You may have to fiddle and finagle a tad to get it just the way you like.  Once you have it, then press it good and place a pin in the center to hold it.  Note: you can fold it the opposite way to have different fabrics facing.

Fold #2, crease with iron

Fold #2, crease with iron

The last part is top stitching.  You could go crazy with decorative stitches if you want, but the area is small, and it’s on the thick side with layers and folds.  I chose a nice, classic, straight top-stitch.  I changed my all purpose/zigzag presser foot to a zipper foot, lengthened my stitches to (3), and used a 1/8″ seam allowance.  I stitched from the very top of one side down the bottom, pivoting with my needle down, sewing across the bottom, then all the way to the top on the other side.  I don’t reinforce my stitches when top-stitching by backing over them – it makes for messy top stitching (mine are messy enough already.)  Rather, I leave a nice long tail at the beginning and end.  Then when I’m done, I use a needle to pull the thread to the back, tie a knot, then bury the thread in the seam – never to be seen again.  I think I read about this in Threads Magazine, years ago.  You could also start with a very tight-short stitch for 1/4″, then lengthen it, but I found this works well.  The beginning and end of my top-stitching always look nice, now I just have to loose the waviness.  Press your pouch one more time to set the top-stitching into the fabric – it really does make a noticeable difference.  This pouch has three pockets for your scissors and a few other do-dads as well.  I choose to not launder my fabric prior to working with it, for two reasons.  First, I think the stiffness of the unwashed fabric lends itself well to the function of the pouch.  Secondly, I don’t plan to wash my pouch, so I shouldn’t have to worry about shrinkage or biasing.  I hope you give this little project a go, it’s real simple and produces something cute and useful.  

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A website devoted to learning, sharing and teaching a wide range of fiber arts. Inkle, Tablet and Navajo style weaving, Spinning, Knitting, Crochet, Sewing and Lace Making. Silver Work, Beading and Tool Making grace my bench as well.

5 comments on “Scissor Pouch
  1. Leda Goldsmith says:

    Lovely scissors! I can understand how they will be happy in this inventive, pretty pouch. Thanks!

    • Thank you, Leda. They’re beautiful, and I love them. I’m always reminded of the trip and time I spent with my Mother. They are quite happy in their new home, and I don’t have to look for them. This holder was fun to make, and so handy. Thanks for reading and leaving a comment.
      Janean

  2. Chelsea says:

    This is totally great! I now have holiday present ideas for about half my friends. Thank you for sharing.

    • I love them too. They are found on lots of blogs, but I had to have one (or two). Then I had to share it. Enjoy making them, they’re a breeze and fun.
      Janean

    • Matty says:

      Hi, I just passed this onto a friend who was doing a little research on that. And he just bought me lunch since I found it for him. 🙂 So let me rephrase that: Thank you for lunch!

      We strain to renew our capacity for wonder, to shock ourselves.

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