Over-Under-Repeat

DVD Project 1

Weaving the third blue shape

Weaving the third blue shape

Weaving this project will be different from the other projects I’ve worked on.  Using the Cartoon is easier said than done.  To begin with, I think I may overlook my mark and weave past it, so I mark my warp all along the first third of the weaving.  Either I was looking at an angle, the warp stretched, or the cartoon changed position, but I soon realized that all my marks are off from my cartoon.  I’ve decided to follow my cartoon instead of my marks, and I’ve also decided to not mark my warp again.  I like the way Nancy starts and stops her wefts on the DVD.  she just pushes them out to the back of her warp – no knot, no half hitch, no muss no fuss.  I decided to use the Navajo method of breaking it off leaving a wispy tail and over laying the tails in the shed.  This  makes it reversible, and while it won’t need to be reversible It’s always good practice.  I will likely use her method in the next few projects.

Weaving by the shape is foreign to me

Weaving by the shape is foreign to me

On the DVD, Nancy instructs me to weave only shape A, the blue shape and ignore shape B.  Placing only one pick in at shape B to have it set up and going in the right direction and shed. At first I follow this and find it rather easy to weave according to the cartoon.  I begin to worry about the need to count how many warps I move over on each turn, so I catch up with the green in shape B.  I realize that while I like the fact that I’m weaving shape A fairly close to the cartoon and the slope looks good, I don’t find the join between the colors smooth.  I re-watch the video to be certain that I’m not doing anything different.  Right off the bat, I notice that her cartoon looks different from mine and the pattern supplied in the DVD.  It looks the same  for the most part, but there are differences.

Wefts from adjoining shapes should travel in opposite directions

Wefts from adjoining shapes should travel in opposite directions

When I come to the place where shape C, the red shape comes into play, I need to change the direction of one of my wefts, so that all adjoining shapes weave in opposite directions.  I was just getting ready to start a new weft of blue, so I started this in a new direction.  Once I had the red section completed I was thinking about the outline I will need to do in red above the next shape.  It dawned on me; what I needed between the shapes to make the join smoother was an outline first in the color just woven, then in the color to be woven.  So I wove two picks of red to outline the shape below, then two picks of blue to outline the shape to be woven on top.  My line as I wove along is much smoother.  I realize that using this technique means that I need to weave one shape at a time instead of “from side to side”.  

Weaving over the two outlines for a smoother join

Weaving over the two outlines for a smoother join

I find it difficult to weave the next shape because It’s not easy to see what warp I turned on in the previous shape.  Since I have four picks of outline, I have to continually pull up a few rows of weaving to check how many warps to weave over before turning.  Once I learned this lesson, I’ve decided to mark on a scrap of paper my turns, and I can mark them off as I do them.  Once my shape is ready to begin to recede I note how many warps over I move over in each turn for each side.  I wove an outline in blue, then in red.  Now when I begin my next shape, also in blue, I can check off the number as I make each turn.  My cartoon has become a pain.  I have it stapled to cardboard and the cardboard tied to the top loom post.  I find it difficult to follow and it moves side to side very easy.  I removed it from the cardboard and covered it in packing tape to give it some strength.  I pinned it to the bottom of the weaving, but it’s hard to position once the weaving has advanced.  In the next projects I will handle the cartoon differently and use the outlining technique to keep the lines of my slopes, angles and diagonals smoother.

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