DVD Project Two Started

Warping the Kliot Tapestry Loom

Double Half Hitches tied on each warp

Double Half Hitches tied on each warp

My next project is a 14 inch by 14 inch square.  I decided to warp 29 inches as I could simply lash the two warp rods to each of the ends and twist the ends to tension.  The pegs on the back that serve as a warping board are a little short for this.  I’ll have to find some longer pegs unless I want to use a much finer warp, or weave a narrower piece.  Once I had the loom set up and the warp spaced, I was going to create a chain across to keep the warp spaced, but I found this method more difficult than simply laying in several rows of weft with my warp material tightly across and then spacing the warp.  Once I had these few picks in for spacing, I tied double “Half Hitch” knots to each warp.  This will prevent the weaving from raveling.  I won’t have to worry about weaving my warp ends in when I’m done, I can simply fold over the hem and stitch it down.  I set up my loom with string heddles for each shed, and I’m using the shedding device.  While I really like the way I handle sheds and heddles in the Navajo style, I find this a tad bit easier.

The soumak knot

The soumak knot

I wove the hem with some black Lanaloft yarn from Brown Sheep.  When I felt I had enough hem to fold under, then I wove a row of “Soumak Knots”.  These will give me a raised edge to frame the beginning of my weaving and give more coverage of the warps when the weaving is folded.  I actually liked putting this row in.  It helped reinforce the spacing of the warps and left a nice edge.  I decided to stay with the same color scheme from the first project.  This project starts with horizontal lines.  The Navajo call this “Crystal” for the area that this weave pattern is known, it’s also called “Wavy Lines”.  For this technique, you weave two picks of each color and they create wavy horizontal lines.  The colors start on opposite sides of the weaving.  I started with the green going from right to left and then left to right, then I wove the blue from left to right and then right to left.  When the second color turns and weaves back, it hooks with the fist color so that the first color will be in position and ready to weave after.  This technique has a habit of being messy with two wefts on the selvage, so care has to be taken to snug up at the turn and to hook those wefts properly.  I love the results of this pattern and one day might make an entire weaving in this technique, maybe with some “Soumak” and “Coalmine” thrown in too.

The wefts hook at the selvage

The wefts hook at the selvage

The next part of the weaving calls for three sections with interlocking joins.  I’ve used an interlocking join quite a bit, but Nancy Harvey shows three different ways to do it.  One of the methods she uses is the same technique I learned on the Navajo Reservation.  I’m very comfortable with that join and I would get more from this project if I concentrate on the other two methods.  The method I’m familiar with, all the weft travel in the same direction and wefts are always woven starting with the left and working right.  The wefts cross and interlock over a warp that sits behind the batten or a lowered warp.  The other join that she shows looks smoother and looks the way my joins look on the reverse side.  This method is similar, except that the weft on the right has to cross over a raised warp then interlock over the lowered warp and travel to the right.  Both techniques interlock on every other pick.  I found this technique easy to learn, I just had to fiddle a bit to set it up, but then it went well.  While this join was a bit more even, it wasn’t a lot smoother for me.  Maybe with some practice it will smooth out a bit more.  The most difficult interlock turned out to be my favorite and smoothest.  This technique goes over a raised warp as well, but the wefts are traveling in different directions.  The center will interlock with the right weft on one pick, then it will interlock with the other weft on the next pick.  This technique is especially good when the design changes, like when the red section widens.  I found the left half of the red section had the best interlock joins I’ve ever made, and the design change the easiest. 

Two different joins to compare

Two different joins to compare

I started holding my cartoon to the back of the weaving with T-pins.  I didn’t like the fact that it created a large raised ridge where the T-pins were.  I switched to safety pins, I found they created less of a ridge and I think I might get some quilting pins.  Quilting pins are rounded to prevent displacing the layers when you quilt them together.  Eventually, I decided that the ridge the safety pins created was too much also and took a contrasting sewing thread and sharp needle and ran a row of running stitches across, holding the cartoon to the weaving, being careful not to pierce any warps.  I’m much happier with this.  I left in the original safety pins as that holds it to where it was initially placed, but I removed the rest of the pins.  I placed a few pins at the selvages to keep the cartoon from flapping about with the fans running like they are.  They are placed in a way to avoid any ridges.  I’ll see about getting some quilting pins and try them out.  I basically don’t want anything that will create a ridge in my weaving, no matter how temporary.  I’ll have to pull these stitches out when I’m done, but that should be easy.  I did accidentally use a few back stitches and those I’ll have to fiddle with, but there’s only about five of those and they’re loose.  I really didn’t need a cartoon for this weaving but made one anyway.  Once again I find the pattern different from what she’s weaving on the DVD.  I was able to correct it and un-weave several rows to keep the design true.  Next project, I will watch the section on the disc as I create the cartoon.  There’s a circle on that one……….

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